30 Years of Mac: White and Male

Apple has a deep-seated diversity problem.

Apple Diversity and GenderIn the 30 Years of Mac mini-site, a thoughtfully prepared homage to the history of the Macintosh and the people who use it to create, there were four women featured out of the twenty-eight profiles. One of the women featured, Noemi Trainor is an educator, a role women are “allowed” to be in. There were no Blacks or Hispanics represented.

There were four non-white males represented in 30 Years of Mac: a Korean, Japanese-American, Japanese, and Lebanese-American were profiled.

It’s easy to say that this has been gone over before. It’s well-known that Apple’s leadership is all white males (soon to include a women, Angela Ahrendts). Using archive.org, I can only find one woman in Apple’s leadership since 1997: Nancy R. Heinen. Nancy Heinen worked at Apple as Senior Vice President and General Counsel from September 1997 to May 2006, until she was sacrificed for backdating stock-options for Steve Jobs. No minorities.

Diversity with a Capital D

Board recruitment is not the problem, culture is.

In the next Apple shareholder meeting, Apple will vote to start to improve their board diversity. Their board charter will be updated to include the following statement:

The nominating committee is committed to actively seeking out highly qualified women and individuals from minority groups to include in the pool from which board nominees are chosen.

It’s obvious by looking at their leadership team and board roster that diversity is simply not a part of the Apple culture. This culture will not change with an improved board recruiting policy. Changing a culture is a much tougher nut to crack. On Sheryl Sandberg’s LeanIn.org website, there’s a suite of tools for increasing organizational diversity through non-biased hiring and management practices. Creating a Level Playing Field, a brilliant talk by Stanford Professor Shelley Correll, would be a good place to start.

It’s gotten bad.

I’m mad at Apple. It’s inexcusable that one of the largest companies in the world, a trendsetting company, does not care more about diversity. Apple should be setting the example for the tech world and being a diversity leader. I’m tired of seeing high-resolution images of Bob Mansfield and Jonny Ive.

I’m aghast that the 30 Years of Mac website features mainly white dudes, apparently the only innovative users of Macs. Surely, Apple could have found some African American innovative graphic designers that used the Mac over the past 30 years and represented more than four women. Apple chose not to.

Who was the editor of 30 Years of Mac? Who looked at the featured profiles and said “This represents our users”? Did someone at Apple say “I think we should feature more minorities and women?” or “Gee, that list of people is really, really white”? If not, that voice needs to be heard, and if someone did say that, that voice needs to be louder.

It’s time for Apple to step up their game and change their culture.

[EDIT] – Apple has promoted Denise Young Smith, an African-American woman, to run HR. Here’s a snippet from the Bloomberg article:

Smith is the latest woman to join Apple’s top ranks, which also include Katie Cotton, vice president of communications, and Angela Ahrendts, the former Burberry Group Plc chief executive officer who will lead retail operations.

Gender and race is a touchy topic, and I’m trying to represent my point of view without being disrespectful. If I use any language the you find offensive, please let me know.

How to Change the Width of the Reading List Sidebar in Safari

For the record, I know this is a silly hack.

Add a new item to the `~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.Safari.plist` file:

Key: `SidebarSplitViewDividerPosition`
Type: "Number"
Value: `400`

For the value, use whatever width you want in the number of pixels. I think I like 400.

Get URL for Searches in Safari 6

There have been many articles and conversations about the question of how to get the URL of a Google search in Safari 6. Some solutions include using the Terminal to get the URL, using AppleScript,  using bookmarklets, and using Automator. I created a Safari Extension to make this process easier.

Get URL: Easily get the URL of your current tab.

With my Get URL Safari Extension, simply click the toolbar button for a popup that contains the URL of the current page. The URL is already selected, making it simple to copy.

Download the Get URL Safari Extension
(.safariextz, 46 kb)

Update: I’ve received notice from Apple that the extension will be available in the Safari Extensions Gallery. Look for it there soon!

Disable Styles and Javascript in Safari with Keyboard Shortcuts – How To

Now Safari’s just as cool as Firefox

If you’re a web developer on the Mac, you may be sick of everyone talking about Firefox Addons that do everything but wipe your ass. True, Firefox is a great browser that is very expandable, but I love Safari, and I want to do as much web development on Safari as possible.

The feature that I missed the most in Safari was Disable Styles and Disable Javascript, both of which are super-easily done in Firefox via the Web Developer Plugin. With the advent of Safari 3, disabling CSS and Javascript is as simple as a keystroke combination of your choice! Continue reading “Disable Styles and Javascript in Safari with Keyboard Shortcuts – How To”

Speed up your Mac – only thing that worked for me!

I’ve tried repairing the permissions. Limiting desktop icons. Removing Safari’s support for ICO icons.  Clearing more hard drive space.  Nothing. Frickin’. Worked. I have been so frustrated by how slow my Mac Pro has been.  I have 2 2.66GHz dual-core processors, 2 GB of memory, and still I was getting spinning beach balls, crunching hard drives and slow menus…and nothing seemed to fix it. I decided to take action.  I was fed up!  And you know what?  It’s really quite simple.


Continue reading “Speed up your Mac – only thing that worked for me!”