How to fix UTF-8 filename issues when using wp_handle_upload()

PHP said the file didn’t exist. Except it did.

file_exists() wasn’t working for a file uploaded using wp_handle_upload(). It worked for every other file, except for one provided by a German customer.

I confirmed the following:

  • The file did exist in the correct wp-uploads sub-directory
  • The file had correct permissions
  • The directory and its parents had correct permissions

I was stumped.

Then I renamed the file

I converted indlæsning to indlaesning and it worked. The problem was with UTF-8 characters in the filename.

But how can this be? Let’s see where the file name comes from:

  • _wp_handle_upload() calls
  • wp_unique_filename() to generate a unique file name, which calls
  • sanitize_file_name() to prepare the file name
  • sanitize_file_name() then checks against a list of special characters that are not allowed in file names:
$special_chars = array("?", "[", "]", "/", "\\", "=", "", ":", ";", ",", "'", "\"", "&", "$", "#", "*", "(", ")", "|", "~", "`", "!", "{", "}", "%", "+", chr(0));

This list of characters can be modified using the sanitize_file_name_chars filter, but that seemed more complicated than I wanted.

The sanitize_file_name() function also includes a sanitize_file_name filter, which allows you to modify the name of the file after it’s already been sanitized.

Luckily, WordPress already has a function to convert other UTF-8 characters into Latin equivalents: remove_accents(). I used that to convert the filename into something file_exists() could handle.

Here’s how to fix UTF-8 issues with wp_handle_upload()

That converted the filename from: indlæsning.csv to indlaesning.csv. Note that the æ character got converted to ae.

The result? Finally, file_exists().

How to Tell if Your WordPress Widget is Active

Check your  widget activation & settings

Also, How to Check Plugin Status

Ever wonder if your widget is activated on an external site?

Here’s how to find out.

When you register a sidebar widget, you use code like this:

register_sidebar_widget(array('Name of Widget', 'class-of-widget'), 'widget_function');

If you want to check whether the widget is activated (you may want to for a variety of reasons), you can do it like this (the “class-of-widget” value from above will be used in the code below): Continue reading “How to Tell if Your WordPress Widget is Active”

Use .htaccess to make all your HTML files PHP

Note: the following will not work on all server configurations, which may be why you’re using SSI in the first place. Call your server administrator/tech support and see if the following techniques are supported.

Escape static HTML

If you want the power and flexibility of PHP but don’t want to (or can’t) shift away from HTML, you can actually tell your server to read all HTML files as PHP by making one simple change to a file called .htaccess.

Here’s how:

  1. Create a file called .htaccess if you don’t have one already, and save it to your root folder
  2. Add one of the following pieces of code into your .htaccess file. Depending on your server configuration, one or the other should work…you’ll just have to try them out to see which one works for you:
    • AddType application/x-httpd-php .php .html or
    • AddHandler x-mapp-php4 .html .htm
      AddHandler x-mapp-php5 .html .htm
      (thanks to Florent V. below) or
    • <FilesMatch ".s?html?$">
      SetHandler application/x-httpd-php
      </FilesMatch>
  3. Save the file and upload it to your server.

Now, you’re able to use all of PHP’s goodness by adding one line of code!

For GoDaddy.com

GoDaddy-hosted websites should use AddHandler x-httpd-php5 .php .shtml .html .htm instead.