New Yahoo! domain prices — can they be serious?

Is Yahoo! nuts? They want too much moolah (piles of money)
Is Yahoo! nuts? They want a 351% increase for domains!

Might as well say “This is Yahoo calling…and we need your money.”

I just got an email from Yahoo! Domains (where I registered madeindenver.com) that says the following:

Important note: Beginning on July 1, 2008, Yahoo!’s annual domain renewal price increases to $34.95 per year.

Yahoo is going to charge $34.95 a year for domains, up from $9.95. This is unbelievable. I know they’re trying to bolster their bottom line so Microsoft and Icahn stay away, but is charging 351% more than before, and 500% markup the way to do it?

If you’re going to pay too much money for something, you might as well treat yourself to Starbucks and enjoy it.

People are pissed off.

Yahoo needs all the good press it can get.  This was stupid and an abuse of their stature.

3 Simple Steps to keyword order SEO – Are your words SEO friendly?

Out of Order
Much search engine optimization revolves around guessing how users will search to find your site. When you’re optimizing for organic (non-paid) search results, you may be surprised to find out how much word order impacts the search ranking.

Optimize your website for organic search with varying keyword order

If you search the major search engines, you will find that the order of your keywords makes a huge difference on where your website ranks. Continue reading “3 Simple Steps to keyword order SEO – Are your words SEO friendly?”

Optimizing a website for search: Google vs. Yahoo! and MSN

Google remains the Search Engine King (Pie Chart)

When I think SEO, I think of Google. Why? Is it because Google’s PageRank system determines better websites? Is it because Google’s advertising options are superior? It’s as simple as this: Google gets better results than any other search engine.

The major search engines often don’t agree

Optimizing websites for search is frustrating sometimes. The biggest search engines are Google, Yahoo!, and MSN. The frustrating part of optimization is the variation between the search engines. The variations in ranking can be huge. I will use Katz Web Design’s ranking information to show some examples:

Google Yahoo! MSN Difference
Denver Web Designer 1 8 3 4
Lakewood Website Design 26 7 298 292
Web Design Denver 27 52 103 66
Denver Web Page Design 20 519 > 1000 Over 980!

So you see, there’s a crazy variation between the search engines that can be frustrating. My statistics show, however, that even a bad ranking in Google is better than a good ranking on any other search engine.

Ranking Update:

Since I wrote this post, my site has come up significantly in search results for the terms listed. As a result, the disparity of the results is much less than it had been. Here are the stats as of November 8, 2008:

Google Yahoo! MSN Difference
Denver Web Designer 3 3 2 1
Lakewood Website Design 359 120 96 263
Web Design Denver 27 11 18 16
Denver Web Page Design 24 2 3 22

92% of my organic keyword search traffic comes from Google

A vast majority of my traffic to my website comes from Google. What about my some of my clients?

Google % Yahoo % MSN % Google % Difference
Client A 83.1 6.6 7 76.1
Client B 85.9 6.73 5.74 79.17
Client C 70.4 20.37 0 50.03
Client D 80.4 8.1 8.0 72.3

These clients have similar ranking placement on Google, MSN, and Yahoo! for many of their keywords. You can see that even so, Google still sends an average of 69.4% more visitors to these websites. Optimizing for other search engines doesn’t have the same return on investment as optimizing for Google does. Google remains king.

What’s your experience with optimizing for various keywords across the search engines?