Receive Email Updates from Constant Contact Surveys: Feature Request

Constant Contact Surveys

Update: Constant Contact has implemented this feature.

Get notified when you receive new survey responses

I use the CC Survey feature to send out web design questionnaires to potential clients. As such, I keep a survey open and receive responses sporadically. Currently, there’s no way to be notified by Constant Contact when my survey receives a response.

A temporary work-around

What I’m doing to get updates is I share the survey results as a separate page, and then submit the url to a RSS-creation service, which will email me when the page changes. FeedWhip also provides an RSS option, so that I could subscribe to the changes. This option works fine, but not well enough!
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How does a 30% conversion rate sound?

I like to brag every now and then.

Landing page conversionWhen we set out to design a landing page for my Denver client, we had our eyes set on a minimum 2% conversion rate for their pay-per-click campaign. Currently, we’re achieving a 15.94% overall conversion rate. I made some tweaks to the form design last week, and for the past 6 days, the landing page is getting a 30% conversion rate (that’s pretty good :-))

Focusing on the front door.

The reason we’ve been able to get such good results is because we’re focusing on one thing: having people sign up for a form. No longer is the internet about websites. The internet is now about front doors. Showing people exactly what they want to see — and sometimes only what they want to see — is how to improve your conversion rate.

Don’t lock users in and throw away the key.

Amazon’s Cage

Amazon cages me in. If you go to Amazon, place something in your cart, then begin the checkout process, they make it impossible (without clicking the Back button a lot) to return to their store. They throw away any chance of revising your order, adding a product, or just browsing around — they sacrifice user experience for the sake of conversion rates.

Guide users through a funnel, don’t force them

Amazon.com no longer shows you how much shipping will be until you’re at the final checkout page. They used to show you right up front, but now you have to get to the final checkout page to find out shipping costs. Very annoying. Always give users the information they want, even if it means some will choose an option you don’t want them to. Give users a way out.

Landing page design – Dish Network

Dish Network Landing Page Screenshot

Katz Web Design has just completed a landing page for Dish Network (a Fortune 300 company) to help them streamline their hiring process.

(By the way, if you’re looking for a sales job near Denver, Colorado [in Littleton], check out Dish. They’ve got great packages for sales representatives.)

The purpose of a landing page (or “Squeeze page,” “Funnel page”, or “Lead capture page”) is to keep the user focused on only what you want them to do. In this case, Dish wanted users to:

  1. Fill out a form to start their job application process
  2. Become informed of the job benefits
  3. Get directions to the application location

The landing page design is done in PHP, allowing for future expandability. This allows the text and images to be swapped out dynamically. The one landing page design can be used for many different job positions and locations, even different languages.

I will be writing articles based on the research and results from the landing page design in the near future, including A/B testing, dynamic content with PHP, Google Analytics & Adwords tracking, and more.

What would you like to know about landing page web design?