{Gravity Forms Shortcode Explained|Gravity Forms Shortcode – A Detailed Explanation}

This post is about Gravity Forms, a WordPress contact form plugin.

I know about Gravity Forms…but what are shortcodes?

Think of shortcodes as a placeholder for where other content will be displayed: instead of “Insert a Gravity Forms form here,” we use the `gravityform` shortcode. Learn more about shortcodes on WordPress.org.

The Gravity Forms `shortcode` has five pieces:

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  1. `id` (required) – The ID of the form, as displayed on the Gravity Forms Edit Forms page in the Id column
  2. `name` (required) – The name of the form.
  3. `title` – Show the title to users? Default is true; set to “false” to disable
  4. `description` – Show the form’s description to users? Default is true; set to “false” to disable.
  5. `ajax` – Submit the form without refreshing? Default is false; set to “true” to enable.

Gravity Forms Shortcode Examples:

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Will result in Form #1 being displayed without a title or description, with no-refresh entry submission. Continue reading “{Gravity Forms Shortcode Explained|Gravity Forms Shortcode – A Detailed Explanation}”

WordPress Digg Shortcode Function – As Seen on WordPress.com

When moving from WordPress.com, my Digg shortcodes broke.

I wanted a simple way to transition my Digg chicklets to a WordPress.org installation.

I created a function that does nothing special, except for reproducing the Digg shortcode functionality on WordPress.com. All you need to do is enter [digg=http://digg.com/path_to_story_on_digg], and it will create a Digg This chicklet for you. Here’s the code in action →

Continue reading “WordPress Digg Shortcode Function – As Seen on WordPress.com”