{Gravity Forms Shortcode Explained|Gravity Forms Shortcode – A Detailed Explanation}

This post is about Gravity Forms, a WordPress contact form plugin.

I know about Gravity Forms…but what are shortcodes?

Think of shortcodes as a placeholder for where other content will be displayed: instead of “Insert a Gravity Forms form here,” we use the `gravityform` shortcode. Learn more about shortcodes on WordPress.org.

The Gravity Forms `shortcode` has five pieces:

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  1. `id` (required) – The ID of the form, as displayed on the Gravity Forms Edit Forms page in the Id column
  2. `name` (required) – The name of the form.
  3. `title` – Show the title to users? Default is true; set to “false” to disable
  4. `description` – Show the form’s description to users? Default is true; set to “false” to disable.
  5. `ajax` – Submit the form without refreshing? Default is false; set to “true” to enable.

Gravity Forms Shortcode Examples:

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Will result in Form #1 being displayed without a title or description, with no-refresh entry submission. Continue reading “{Gravity Forms Shortcode Explained|Gravity Forms Shortcode – A Detailed Explanation}”

Gravity Forms Ajax Submit – Version 1.4 Adds Ajax Support

The Gravity Forms plugin has recently updated to Version 1.4, and it adds a bunch of features. The one I am most excited about is Ajax submission – this means that the form no longer requires a page reload to display errors and to submit. This brings the plugin in line with Contact Form 7 and cFormsII in this functionality.

I was looking for how to enable the new Ajax submission feature on my forms, and had a moment of doubt. Here’s how: Continue reading “Gravity Forms Ajax Submit – Version 1.4 Adds Ajax Support”